The 2009 CDC/CCC thanks Gold Sponsors



Shanghai 2009
December 16 - 18

Sponsoring Organizations

Workshops

Please click here for room information about the approved workshops, all of which will start at 8:00 am on December 15, 2009.

The CDC/CCC 2009 is offering thirteen pre-conference workshops on Tuesday December 15, 2009. Pre-registration for these workshops is strongly encouraged. To pre-register, please visit the conference registration page at http://css.paperplaza.net/registration.

The workshops will be offered based on viable attendance. The CDC/CCC 2009 reserves the right to cancel non-viable workshops. In the event that a workshop is canceled the workshop fee will be refunded in full.

STUDENTS: The Control Systems Society is repeating an initiative to allow students free attendance at one of the workshops. If you are a Student Member of both the IEEE and the Control Systems Society in the year 2009 and you are interested in attending one of the workshops offered at the CDC/CCC 2009, you can take this possibility for free. Go to the Student Support page for details.

List of Workshops Offered at the CDC/CCC 2009

20 Years of Passivity-Based Control: Theory and Applications
Alessandro Astolfi (University of Roma, Italy), Fernando Castaños (SUPELEC-L2S, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), David Hill (The Australian National University, Australia), Romeo Ortega (SUPELEC, France), Mark Spong (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA)

An Introduction to Option Trading for Control Engineers (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
B. Ross Barmish (University of Wisconsin, USA), James A. Primbs (Stanford University, USA)

Five Decades of Ho-ntrol and Ho-ptimization
Christos G. Cassandras (Boston University, USA), Weibo Gong (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA)

Applied Fractional Calculus in System Controls (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
Yangquan Chen (Utah State University, USA)

RISE-Based Robust and Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Systems (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
W. E. Dixon, Parag Patre (University of Florida, USA)

Modeling and Control Problems in Machine and Animal (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
Bijoy K. Ghosh (Texas Tech University, USA)

Foundations of Hybrid Systems (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
John Lygeros (ETH Zurich, Switzerland), T. John Koo (Shantou University, China)

Network Science: New Directions in Control Systems
Nader Motee (California Institute of Technology, USA)

Stability and Control of Time-Delay Systems (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
Silviu-Iulian Niculescu (CNRS, L2S, CNRS-SUPELEC, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), Keqin Gu (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, USA), Jie Chen (University of California, Riverside, USA)

Biomolecular Circuit Analysis and Design
Antonis Papachristodoulou (University of Oxford, UK), Domitilla Del Vecchio (University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, USA)

Distributed Estimation and Filtering over Adaptive Networks (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
Ali H. Sayed (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)

Deterministic Learning and Pattern-based Control (Workshop withdrawn; see below)
Cong Wang (South China University of Technology, China), David J. Hill (The Australian National University, Australia)

Model Predictive Control: Design and Implementation Using MATLAB®
Liuping Wang (RMIT University, Australia)

Workshops Descriptions

20 Years of Passivity-Based Control: Theory and Applications

Organizers: Alessandro Astolfi (University of Roma, Italy), Fernando Castaños (SUPELEC-L2S, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), David Hill (The Australian National University, Australia), Romeo Ortega (SUPELEC, France), Mark Spong (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: Using the fundamental notion of passivity, the idea of energy shaping was formalized 20 years ago, when the term passivity-based control (PBC) was coined to define a controller design methodology whose aim is to render the closed-loop system passive with a given storage function. PBC is now one of the dominant control techniques with many theoretical extensions and practical applications reported in the literature. The theoretical developments include significant extensions to the basic concepts and the proposition of alternative paradigms to handle control scenarios other than just stabilization, e.g., synchronization, oscillation generation. On the application side the method has provided solutions to a wide variety of physical problems and has been warmly adopted by practitioners in many engineering fields. The purpose of this seminar is to review the fundamental theory, main new results and practical applications of this control system design approach as well as to discuss the current open problems and future directions.

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An Introduction to Option Trading for Control Engineers

Organizers: B. Ross Barmish (University of Wisconsin, USA), James A. Primbs (Stanford University, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: The main goal of this workshop is to teach control engineers the basics of option trading. While applications and educational aspects will receive the highest priority, formulation of new research problems will also be discussed. A background in economics will not be assumed. One of the main points of the workshop will be the following: In the world of trading, "arbitrageurial thinking" is far more important than thinking like an economist. In fact, in this context, the instructors will argue that "thinking like a control theorist"" is also quite important.
We envision two groups of attendees. The first group, perhaps motivated by the market crash over the last two years, no longer wants to blindly trust an "advisor" to make financial decisions. This attendee, being a member of the control community, has a high degree of technical expertise, and can easily master the concepts underlying option trading. Some of these attendees may want to master the workshop material so that they can reduce volatility of their personal investments in these turbulent financial times. In this regard, wanting to do research in this area is not a prerequisite for attendance at workshop.
The second group of attendees, while certainly not disjoint from the first, is the control researcher who is looking for new and exciting problems to solve. Since our goal is to get the control community "up to speed" on option trading, new research problems, while certainly discussed, will receive lower priority than educational aspects. However, our point of view is that once the "rules of the road" are well understood, the science-minded members of are field are intelligent enough to formulate and solve many important new research problems. In fact, as evidenced by the instructor's semi-plenary on stock trading at the 2008 CDC, this area is ripe for control theory research.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Five Decades of Ho-ntrol and Ho-ptimization

Organizers: Christos G. Cassandras (Boston University, USA), Weibo Gong (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA)

Additional Participants: Dah Ming Chiu (Chinese University of Hong Kong, China), Xi-Ren Cao (Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China), Pirooz Vakili (Boston University, USA), Leyuan Shi (University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA), Qing-Shan Jia (Tsinghua University, USA), Peter B. Luh (University of Connecticut, USA), J.Q. Hu, Yifan Xu, BaiMei Yang (Fudan University, China), Xiaohong Guan (Tsinghua University, China)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: The professional career of Professor Yu-Chi (Larry) Ho in the systems and control community started nearly fifty years ago. Over the past five decades, he has been a leading influential figure in several areas of control and optimization. Briefly, he received his S.B. and S.M. degrees in Electrical Engineering from M.I.T. and his Ph.D. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University. Except for three years of full-time industrial work, he spent the rest of his career on the Harvard faculty. Since 1969, he has been Gordon McKay Professor of Engineering and Applied Mathematics. In 1988, he was appointed to the T. Jefferson Coolidge Chair in Applied Mathematics and Gordon McKay Professor of Systems Engineering at Harvard; he was also a visiting Professor to the Cockrell Family Regent's Chair in Engineering at the University of Texas, Austin. In 2001, he retired from teaching duties at Harvard and became a Research Professor (2001-2006), Professor Emeritus (2007- present) and was also appointed as Chair Professor and Chief Scientist (part-time) at the Center for Intelligent and Networked Systems (CFINS), Department of Automation, Tsinghua University, Beijing China.
He has published over 120 journal articles and four books, one of which (co-authored with A.E. Bryson, Jr.) has been translated into both Russian and Chinese and made the list of Citation Classics as one of the most referenced works on the subject of optimal control. He is the Founding Editor of the International Journal on Discrete Event Dynamic Systems. He is the recipient of various fellowships and awards including the Guggenheim (1970), the IEEE Field Award for Control Engineering and Science (1989), the Chiang Technology Achievement Award (1993), the American Automatic Control Council Bellman Control Heritage Award (1999), the ASME Rufus Oldenburger Award (1999), and the Isaacs Award from the International Society of Dynamic Games (2004). He is an IEEE Life Fellow and an INFORMS Inaugural Fellow, a Distinguished Member of the IEEE Control Systems Society, a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering and an elected foreign member of the Chinese Academy of Engineering and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. In addition to services on various governmental and industrial panels, and professional society administrative bodies, he was the Program Chair for the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control in 1972, the General Chair of the IEEE Robotics and Automation Conference in 1987, and President of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Society in 1988.
Professor Ho is turning 75 this year. Some of his former students who are very active in the systems and control community felt compelled to organize a Workshop at the CDC in his native Shanghai dedicated to him. Such a Workshop is not only called for as a tribute to his long-lasting contributions, but also as an opportunity for many in our community to examine the effects of his legacy in our discipline: many currently vigorous research topics to be covered in the proposed Workshop have their roots in the work of Larry Ho and his former students. Moreover, there are many "lessons to be learned" (especially for younger researchers) on how research should be conducted and how fundamental problems in emerging areas should be analyzed, something Larry Ho has taught many of us with his unique perspective on the interplay between theory and applications.

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Applied Fractional Calculus in System Controls

Organizers: Yangquan Chen (Utah State University, USA), Igor Podlubny (Technical University of Kosice, Slovak Republic)

Additional Participants: Dingyu Xue (Northeastern University, China), Hongsheng Li (Nanjing Institute of Technology, China), Changbin Ma (UM-SJTU Joint Institute, Shanghai Jiaotong University, China)

Workshop length: Half-day

Abstract: Why Fractional Calculus? Many real dynamic systems are better characterized using a non-integer order dynamic model based on fractional calculus or, differentiation or integration of non-integer order. Traditional calculus is based on integer order differentiation and integration. The concept of fractional calculus has tremendous potential to change the way we see, model, and control the nature around us. Denying fractional derivatives is like saying that zero, fractional, or irrational numbers do not exist.
In the control side, clearly, for closed-loop control systems, there are four situations. They are 1) IO (integer order) plant with IO controller; 2) IO plant with FO (fractional order) controller; 3) FO plant with IO controller and 4) FO plant with FO controller. From control engineering point of view, doing something better is the major concern. Existing evidences have confirmed that the best fractional order controller outperforms the best integer order controller. It has also been answered in the literature why to consider fractional order control even when integer (high) order control works comparatively well. Fractional order PID controller tuning has reached to a matured state of practical use. Since (integer-order) PID control dominates the industry, we believe FO-PID will gain increasing impact and wide acceptance. Furthermore, we also believe that based on some real world examples, fractional order control is ubiquitous when the dynamic system is of distributed parameter nature.

Web: http://mechatronics.ece.usu.edu/foc/

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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RISE-Based Robust and Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Systems

Organizers: Warren E. Dixon, Parag Patre (University of Florida, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: In recent years, a new intelligent nonlinear control method has emerged that can identify and compensate for a broad class of disturbances. This method is coined RISE because the structure of the controller is a PI element with an additional Robust Integral of the Sign of the Error element. Advantages of the RISE method are that it is non-model based and yields asymptotic tracking despite a general class of smooth disturbances. The workshop will describe the basic structure of the RISE method. Details will be provided pertaining to how the closed-loop error system dynamics can be segregated into different classes that facilitate the definition of non-traditional Lyapunov function. The method will be extended to higher dimensional systems. Details will also be provided that describe how the method can be combined with other feedforward techniques (model-based and non-model-based) to yield improved performance with modular and composite adaptation. The implicit learning capability of the RISE method will be exploited to develop an optimal controller using the HJB optimization scheme. Experimental results are provided to illustrate the potential for improved performance. Other recent applications of the method will also be presented including artificial muscle stimulation, image-based state estimation, aircraft control. The workshop will conclude with a discussion of example applications, experimental results, open technical problems, and future research directions. The desired outcome of the workshop is to provide a detailed exposition of the methods such that the audience appreciates the advantages and limitations of the various methods for different classes of practical engineering applications.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Modeling and Control Problems in Machine and Animal

Organizers: Bijoy K. Ghosh (Texas Tech University, USA)

Additional Participants: Martin Buss and Angelika Peer (Technische Universitat München, Germany), Antoine Chaillet (Laboratoire des Signaux et Systèmes, Supélec, France), Magnus Egerstedt (Georgia Tech University, USA), Ted Iwasaki (University of Virginia, USA), William Levine (University of Maryland, USA), Sridevi Sarma (Johns Hopkins University, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: The primary goal of this workshop is to introduce modeling, sensing and control problems that arise in the human brain. We are also interested in how many of these problems are tackled by robots and what if any are issues that have to do with human-robot interaction. The algorithms are of course processed in the brain and in recent years there has been a serious attempt to model various aspects of the ¡®brain dynamics¡¯. Extending this line of modeling, this workshop would also present how deep brain electrical stimulation can provide therapy for patients with Parkinson¡¯s disease.
The workshop has two talks that would highlight robots and human-robot interaction; one talk would be on Biomechanics of posture control and two talks on controlling activities in the brain by electrical stimulation. Finally, there will be two talks on modeling different parts of the animal brain for the purpose of sensing, control and pattern generation.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Foundations of Hybrid Systems

Organizers: John Lygeros (ETH Zurich, Switzerland), T. John Koo (Shantou University, China)

Additional Participants: Daizhan Cheng (Chinese Academy of Sciences, China), Joao Hespanha (University of California at Santa Barbara, USA), Daniel Liberzon (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, USA), George Pappas (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: This proposal elaborates on the motivations, the topics, the invited presenters, and the target audience for a workshop entitled "Foundations of Hybrid Systems". The workshop aims to cover the theoretical foundations for the modeling, analysis, control and computation of hybrid systems and stochastic hybrid systems. In the past few years these classes of systems have been a particular focus of intense investigation, both at a theoretical and at a computational level within the systems theory and control community. Despite of this there have been relatively few tutorials or PhD schools on hybrid systems offered in China. We hope to take this opportunity to target the workshop primarily to students, researchers and practitioners who are interested in getting started in this area.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Network Science: New Directions in Control Systems

Organizers: Nader Motee (California Institute of Technology, USA)

Additional Participants: Fan Chung Graham (University of California, San Diego, USA), Ali Jadbabaie (University of Pennsylvania, USA), Sanjoy Mitter (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA), Jeff Shamma (Georgia Institute of Technology, USA)

Workshop length: Half-day

Abstract: Many current engineering visions convincingly suggest that net-centric technology can provide unprecedented levels of performance, robustness, and efficiency. Nonetheless, there is substantial confusion regarding the obstacles to achieving this vision, and our proposed workshop aims at clarifying and addressing the central research challenges. Essentially what is needed is a deeper understanding of network structure and function, beyond naive graph-theoretic measures of large-scale connectivity, that incorporates the domain-specific drivers and constraints on system organization and dynamics.
The invited speakers in this workshop have been pioneers in developing a mathematical and behavioral theory of networks, ranging from spectral graph theory to networked dynamical systems, and from information theory to interplay of communications theory, game theory and operations research. The main theme of this workshop is to provide new insights in the following topics:

  • New modelling paradigms for networks beyond graphs
  • Novel approaches to an information theory of networks
  • New behavioral and mathematical models/methods for collective problem-solving over networks
  • Innovative paradigms and models for evolution of networks of dynamical systems
  • Tools for understanding the robustness and evolvability as well as fragilities of complex networks

These topics represent very active research areas, which not only span through the systems and control community, but also information theory and social sciences. Nevertheless, there are still many interesting open problems, some of which we shall discuss in the workshop. The goal of this workshop is to bring together leading researchers in network science to foster interdisciplinary communication and collaboration. The workshop focuses on novel directions in networks research within control systems, information theory, mathematics and social sciences. The primary objective of the workshop is to facilitate interactions between researchers from different disciplines interested in utilizing network science.
This workshop offers a series of presentations introducing tools and basic results from a variety of research areas of major interest for the study of complex networks. The main focus is dedicated to talks presenting the latest results on the emerging fields of control systems, information theory, and social sciences. The broader impact of the proposed workshop will be to inspire the research community on new directions in control systems associated with network sciences. I believe that by presenting challenging and important problems to the control community in a coherent fashion, it will help attract new researchers and graduate students. There are tremendous intellectual opportunities in these areas, in which the control community has a good opportunity to contribute and to cooperate with researchers from other fields, such as social sciences and economics.

Click here for further information

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Stability and Control of Time-Delay Systems

Organizers: Silviu-Iulian Niculescu (CNRS, L2S, CNRS-SUPELEC, Gif-sur-Yvette, France), Keqin Gu (Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, USA), Jie Chen (University of California, Riverside, USA)

Additional Participants: Wim Michiels (K.U.Leuven, Belgium), Rifat Sipahi (Northeastern University, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: This one-day tutorial workshop presents both basic knowledge and most recent progress on the stability analysis and control of time-delay systems, as well as some applications with particular emphasis on traffic flow models. The workshop is mainly designed for two groups of audience: i) Industrial practitioners who want to know some of the the basic theories and tools available to analyze and design control systems with time delays; ii) Researchers who wish to get into the area of time-delay systems. Researchers who want to explore the important topics and the most recent progresses in this area may also benefit from this workshop.
Time delays in dynamical systems may arise as an intrinsic part of the system, through feedback channels due to measurement and control implementation, or as a result of simplification of partial differential equations. Process control (as assumed in the classical Ziegler-Nichols tuning rules of PID control) and chaos control are two wellknown examples of control systems involving time delays. The applications of time-delay systems span biology, ecology, economy, and of course, engineering.
The first part of this tutorial workshop is devoted to the fundamentals and some important classic results of timedelay systems, such as functional-differential equations and differential-difference equations of retarded and neutral types, initial conditions, stability, characteristic quasipolynomials, principal term, and distribution of poles, and Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and Razumikhin theorem. The second part of the workshop covers the frequency domain approaches. This includes various methods of stability analysis and control design of systems with single or multiple time delays. Some of the results represent the most recent progress on this topic. These include Rekasius transformation based approaches, geometric approach, eigenvalue optimization. The third part of the workshop covers the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach and coupled differential-functional equations. Topics include simple and complete quadratic Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, modeling of practical time-delay systems as coupled differential-difference equations, lossless progation model, stability of difference equations of continuous time, construction of Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, and equivalence of coupled differential-difference equations of various types. The final part of the workshop covers applications of time-delay systems with emphasis on stability and control of traffic flow systems.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Biomolecular Circuit Analysis and Design

Organizers: Antonis Papachristodoulou (University of Oxford, UK), Domitilla Del Vecchio (University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, USA)

Additional Participants: Mustafa Khammash (University of California at Santa Barbara, USA), Richard Murray (California Institute of Technology, USA), Frank Allgöwer (University of Stuttgart, Germany), Murat Arcak (University of California at Berkeley, USA)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: Systems and Synthetic Biology are two new interdisciplinary research areas that have received a lot of interest in the past years: the first one aims to understand how biological systems function, while the latter considers how such systems can be designed or redesigned for improved or new functionality. To that end, both areas use mathematical modelling and inevitably, tools from control engineering and dynamical systems have found direct and extensive application. At the same time, Systems and Synthetic Biology have driven the development of new control theoretical methods and tools for addressing the complexity and nonlinearity of the models that these disciplines employ. This workshop has three main aims: (1) to present the modelling tools that can be used to describe how biological systems behave at different organizational scales; (2) to review how traditional and new tools which are rooted in systems theory can be used for the analysis of these system descriptions; and (3) to show how such biological networks can be designed and/or redesigned for improved or new functionality both from a theoretical viewpoint and also from a practical one, putting emphasis on the technologies that facilitate this.

Click here for further information

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Distributed Estimation and Filtering over Adaptive Networks

Organizers: Ali H. Sayed (University of California, Los Angeles, USA)

Workshop length: Half-day

Abstract: Distributed networks linking sensors and actuators will form the backbone of future data communication and control networks. Applications will range from sensor networks to precision agriculture, environment monitoring, disaster relief management, smart spaces, target localization, as well as medical applications. In all these cases, the distribution of the nodes in the field yields spatial diversity, which should be exploited alongside the temporal dimension in order to enhance the robustness of the processing tasks and improve the probability of signal and event detection. Distributed processing techniques allow for the efficient extraction of temporal and spatial information from data collected at such distributed nodes by relying on local cooperation and data processing. For example, each node in the network could collect noisy observations related to a certain parameter of interest. The nodes would then interact with their neighboring nodes, as dictated by the network topology, in order to estimate the parameter. The objective is to arrive at an estimate that is as reliable as the one that would be obtained if each node had access to the information across the entire network.
In contrast, in the centralized approach to parameter estimation, the data from all nodes would be conveyed to a central processor where they would be fused and the vector of parameters estimated. Such an approach requires sufficient communications resources to transmit the data back and forth between the nodes and the central processor, which would limit the autonomy of the network besides adding a critical point of failure in the network due to the presence of a central node. A centralized solution also limits the ability of the nodes to adapt in real-time to time varying statistical profiles in the data and the environment.
This tutorial describes recent development in distributed processing over adaptive networks. The presentation discusses distributed filters, estimators, and adaptation mechanisms that allow neighboring nodes to communicate with each other at every iteration. At each node, estimates exchanged with neighboring nodes are fused and promptly fed into the local adaptation rules. In this way, a truly adaptive network is obtained where the structure as a whole is adaptive (including an adaptive topology), and is able to respond in real-time to the temporal and spatial variations in the statistical profile of the data. Different adaptation or learning rules at the nodes, allied with different cooperation protocols, give rise to adaptive networks and topologies of various complexities and potential. Obviously, the effectiveness of any distributed implementation depends on the modes of cooperation that are allowed among the nodes such as incremental, diffusion or probabilistic diffusion.
The tutorial will develop the concept of adaptive networks and show how to design adaptive strategies for distributed processing. The designs will illustrate three major ways of node collaboration (incremental, diffusion, and probabilistic diffusion). The tutorial will further illustrate how to study the performance of an interconnected network of adaptive nodes that are subject to varying spatial and temporal data profiles. Energy conservation arguments and statespace formulations will be exploited to great effect to evaluate the performance of the individual nodes and the network as a whole.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Deterministic Learning and Pattern-based Control

Organizers: Cong Wang (South China University of Technology, China), David J. Hill (The Australian National University, Australia)

Workshop length: Half-day

Abstract: The Deterministic Learning Theory aims to study the largely unexplored area of knowledge acquisition, representation, and utilization in uncertain dynamical environments. Features of deterministic learning include: (i) satisfaction of a partial persistence of excitation (PE) condition due to the employment of localized RBF networks, and (ii) locally-accurate identification of a partial system model associated with a periodic or periodic-like (recurrent) trajectory. The workshop will present systematic design approaches for nonlinear system identification, temporal/dynamical pattern recognition, and pattern-based control of uncertain nonlinear systems.

THIS WORKSHOP WAS WITHDRAWN. Individuals who registered can either receive a full refund or transfer their registration to another workshop.

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Model Predictive Control: Design and Implementation Using MATLAB®

Organizers: Liuping Wang (RMIT University, Australia)

Workshop length: Full-day

Abstract: Model Predictive Control (MPC) has a long history in the field of control engineering. It is one of the few areas that has received on-going interest from researchers in both the industrial and academic communities. Four major aspects of model predictive control make the design methodology attractive to both engineers and academics. The first aspect is the design formulation, which uses a completely multivariable system framework where the performance parameters of the multivariable control system are related to the engineering aspects of the system; hence, they can be understood and 'tuned' by engineers. The second aspect is the ability of method to handle both 'soft' constraints and hard constraints in a multivariable control framework. This is particularly attractive to industry where tight profit margins and limits on the process operation are inevitably present. The third aspect is the ability to perform process on-line optimization. The fourth aspect is the simplicity of the design framework in handling all these complex issues.
This one-day short-course gives an introduction to model predictive control, and recent developments in design and implementation. Beginning with an overview of the field, the course will systematically cover topics in optimization, receding horizon control, MPC design formulations, constrained control, prescribed degree of stability, tuning of predictive control, as well as real-time simulation and implementation using MATLAB® and Simulink® as a platform. The course, based on a predictive control book by the speaker, is suitable for engineers, students and researchers who wish to gain knowledge about model predictive control, as well as understand how to perform real time simulation and implementation using MATLAB and Simulink tools.
http://www.springer.com/engineering/robotics/book/978-1-84882-330-3

Click here for further information

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Initial submissions beginJan. 2, 2009
Invited session proposals closeMar. 6, 2009
All paper submissions close Mar. 6, 2009
Acceptance notificationJuly, 2009
Final submissions begin Aug 1, 2009
Registration openAug 1, 2009
Final submission closeSept. 9, 2009